Monday, October 18, 2010

REVIEW: Evelyn Glennie with the City Chamber Orchestra of Hong Kong

Dame Evelyn Glennie’s astounding acts of rhythm and speed were inseparable to the delight of watching her enthralling feats of dexterity and strength.


The City Chamber Orchestra of Hong Kong led by Jean Thorel served up an evening of premieres in their opening season concert at the Hong Kong City hall on September 25 to a packed house.

To read more about my review for TIME-OUT HONG KONG, just follow the below link:

http://www.timeout.com.hk/music/features/37611/review-dame-evelyn-glennie-at-city-hall.html


Here are a few additional notes to go with my review for Time-Out Hong Kong:


  • For Vivaldi’s Concerto for Flautino in C major, RV443, Glennie took up a faster pace in the 1st and 3rd movement, while applied a slower tempo in the 2nd movement. The overall result took away that lightness and fleeting effect of the recorder as a player catches his/her breath; instead, we got a sustained shower of notes. Blow by blow, my vote goes to a recorder.


  • For British Joe Duddell’s Snowblind for solo percussion and strings, if I have to imagine how music can depict light reflecting and refracting, shimmering and sparkling on a body of water, this must be it. Evelyn Glennie’s playing was as hypnotic and mesmerizing as the composition itself.


  • For encore, Glennie generously performed Askell Masson’s Prim for solo snare drum. Her gripping mastery of technique, tone and rhythm was so intensely spellbinding that her last blow on the drum made the guy in front of me jump! In closing, Glennie performed one of her own compositions, A Little Prayer, a solemnly beautiful close to the evening.

_____



Review: Dame Evelyn Glennie at City Hall
5 of 5 stars
Posted in Time-Out Hong Kong Online on 18 October 2010


City Hall Saturday September 25

Dame Evelyn Glennie’s remarkable rhythm, speed, dexterity and strength were all on display when she joined the Jean Thorel-led City Chamber Orchestra of Hong Kong in front a packed house for the orchestra’s season opener.

After a “pretty” performance of Frank Bridge’s Sir Roger de Coverley for string orchestra, came the most familiar piece of the evening, Vivaldi’s Concerto for Flautino in C major, RV443. Originally written for the smallest member of the recorder family, the flautino (or sopranino), Glennie rearranged it for the vibraphone, taking various tempo liberties with the original score. She took up a faster pace in the 1st and 3rd movement, while applied a slower tempo in the 2nd movement, resulting in a sustained shower of notes that was less light and fleeting than the original.

British Joe Duddell’s Snowblind for solo percussion and strings followed, and it proved to be the concert’s most exciting part. Duddell’s work, making its Asian premiere, was Baroque in structure but impressionist in feel, portraying music that seemed to depicted light reflecting and refracting, shimmering and sparkling on a body of water. And Glennie’s playing was as hypnotic and mesmerizing as the composition itself.

After the interval came another Asian premiere, Alexis Alrich’s Marimba Concerto. The gorgeously crafted three-movement concerto managed to be genuinely inventive and deeply conservative. The piece swept me through a series of action-drama-packed panoramas with Glennie superbly accentuating and providing the bold rhythms and energy.

Glennie then generously closed with Askell Masson’s Prim for solo snare drum, displaying gripping mastery of technique, tone and rhythm,
and her own compositions, A Little Prayer, which was a solemnly beautiful close to the evening.

Satoshi Kyo

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